Subscribe via RSS Feed

Arm DVT

May 23, 2014 0 Comments
Arm DVT

Dr. Lloyd Gordon has a case of proximal arm DVT to share.  Like doing a scan for proximal leg DVT, looking for lack of vein compressibility is key but in the majority of cases if you look carefully you will see some clot in the lumen with varying amounts of echogenicity. So while most of […]

Continue Reading »

Bloody diarrhea in a baby and no U/S tech on-call

May 17, 2014 0 Comments
Bloody diarrhea in a baby and no U/S tech on-call

Dr Daren Lin from Guelph, Ontario posted a great case in the last few days on the CEUS discussion list. With his permission, we have reposted it here on the EDE blog. Take it away , Daren! Last night on my evening shift at a community hospital, I had a 13 month old who presented […]

Continue Reading »

The emotional and visceral pain of a good POCUS call

May 11, 2014 0 Comments
The emotional and visceral pain of a good POCUS call

Dr. Sean Ryan works in a rural hospital with no surgical coverage and in this case there was no access to ultrasound because it was a Saturday morning.   As you know people aren’t supposed to have emergencies in rural communities on weekends requiring ultrasound. A 24 year old woman presents with RLQ pain and Dr. […]

Continue Reading »

We are now available on iBooks!

May 7, 2014 10 Comments
We are now available on iBooks!

In 2012, we published the print book Point-of-Care Ultrasound for Emergency Physicians, combining the course manuals of The EDE course and The EDE 2 Course. Since then, we’ve received numerous requests for an e-book version, so due to popular demand, we have done just that. The e-book is NOW available on the iBooks Store! Retitled Essentials of Point-of-Care […]

Continue Reading »

Incidental findings on Renal POCUS

April 29, 2014 0 Comments
Incidental findings on Renal POCUS

One of the exaggerated fears that was voiced by imaging specialists when POCUS/EDE was first developing was that a whole host of abnormalities would be found on bedside ultrasound that would lead to lots of unnecessary confirmatory tests. The reality is that this fear has not been borne out. Incidental findings on POCUS are few […]

Continue Reading »

Hypothermic Heart on POCUS

April 21, 2014 0 Comments
Hypothermic Heart on POCUS

This never-ending winter reminded me of hypothermia case that I saw a number of years ago. It was an elderly female in her mid-70s with an unclear history. She was found on the ground at the entrance to her home by family one morning in the middle of winter. EMS was activated. She was found […]

Continue Reading »

Exploring airway pathology with POCUS

April 16, 2014 0 Comments
Exploring airway pathology with POCUS

One of my colleagues suspected a subtle presentation of airway problems. A CXR was ordered which suggested something pushing the trachea over to the right. A previous CXR was similar but not as pronounced. A CT showed a mass, looking like a Thyroid Colloid Cyst. As predicted, it was pushing on the trachea.   I […]

Continue Reading »

IVC Meta-Analysis Analyzed

April 9, 2014 1 Comment
IVC Meta-Analysis Analyzed

One of the most interesting and controversial areas of POCUS/EDE is the IVC scan. In fact, it’s soooo controversial that I have have edited the PowerPoint for the course for each of the last 4 courses! Pierre Collin and I are alter-egos for IVC (I do the lecture in English and Pierre handles IVC in […]

Continue Reading »

Time-saving technique for difficult lumbar punctures

April 5, 2014 2 Comments
Time-saving technique for difficult lumbar punctures

Lumbar puncture failure, although not a catastrophic event, is always frustrating and time consuming. Skin marking after identifying spinous processes with ultrasound is an interesting method to increase your success rate. However, real time ultrasound guided lumbar puncture is relatively easy to do and faster than skin marking. I personally use the abdominal probe with […]

Continue Reading »

Scrotal U/S-infection

March 31, 2014 0 Comments
Scrotal U/S-infection

Another pearl from Dr. Gordon regarding scanning the testes: When one testicle shows no flow or much reduced flow on the painful side, torsion is likely. In this patient the presentation was not as acute as expected of torsion. Scrotal U/S showed increased flow on the painful side and the painful testicle was also larger […]

Continue Reading »