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Tag: renal colic

Saving Brainspace with POCUS

February 8, 2018 0 Comments
Saving Brainspace with POCUS

Here is a cool case that Lloyd Gordon recently sent us… “A 60 year-old woman had a fever of 39.6C and vomiting. The triage note mentioned abdominal pain but she didn’t have any pain when I saw her and she never asked for analgesics. Her abdomen was completely benign and she looked well. Not much […]

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My twinkle is better than yours

November 16, 2015 0 Comments
My twinkle is better than yours

Case courtesy of Dr. Joel Turner, Fellowship Director EM Ultrasound, McGill University: 59 year old male with a previous history of renal colic presents with severe LLQ pain, and mild dysuria. He had no fever, no GI symptoms, and was a non-smoker. His urine dipstick was positive for red blood cells. No gross hematuria. While […]

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How often do you use POCUS?

September 27, 2015 0 Comments
How often do you use POCUS?

Dr. Gordon shares the findings from just three recent ED shifts. ┬áThere are many negative and indeterminate scans here but it provides a glimpse into how POCUS is included in the thought process for risk stratification and clinical decision making. This patient complained of R flank pain. POCUS revealed a normal kidney, uterus and pelvis. […]

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Faster, radiation-free approach to Renal Colic with POCUS/EDE

March 7, 2014 6 Comments
Faster, radiation-free approach to Renal Colic with POCUS/EDE

We see LOTS of kidney stones in Sudbury. I’d swear that they mostly contain nickel and not calcium! About 5 years ago, I saw a 31-year-old patient with renal colic. I looked up their medical records on the computer. They had had 12 (!) CT scans in the previous 2 years. Can we do better? […]

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Dr. Gordon: Examples of Hydronephrosis

February 21, 2014 0 Comments
Dr. Gordon: Examples of Hydronephrosis

Hydronephrosis is a nice thing to see. Generally speaking you know the diagnosis when you see it. When it’s severe it’s pretty obvious. One of the pictures here is from a patient with a blocked nephrostomy tube. The pelvis is basically blown up like a balloon in the center of the kidney. Not too hard […]

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