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Tag: cancer

Incidental POCUS Findings – The Gallbladder

June 4, 2018 0 Comments
Incidental POCUS Findings – The Gallbladder

There’s a whole host of abnormalities that one can find on POCUS. Some of them do not represent an acute problem. Most of them are of a minor nature and quite common, and do not need further imaging. But in a few cases, follow-up elective imaging is required. Here’s an example. This elderly patient presented […]

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The C Word & POCUS

December 29, 2017 0 Comments
The C Word & POCUS

Is cancer an emergency medical diagnosis? Technically, it’s not. The primary diagnosis of cancer does not show up in any emergency medicine textbooks. And rightly so. Although the complications of cancer can kill quickly, cancer itself develops relatively slowly. As such, the responsibility for the initial diagnosis of cancer falls largely to family physicians and […]

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Thrombus in Transit Captured with POCUS

December 23, 2015 0 Comments
Thrombus in Transit Captured with POCUS

Dr. Pete Steinmetz is one of the POCUS leaders at McGill University in Montreal. He runs the POCUS program for the med students. Pete and I go way back. We were in the same med school class at McGill…Class of…never the mind the year…it’s not important 😉 Pete sent us this great case! Take it […]

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Dr Richard with a pneumonia that just won’t go away!

January 13, 2015 1 Comment
Dr Richard with a pneumonia that just won’t go away!

Thoracic EDE is one of the hot topics in the POCUS world. This is Ben Ho’s chapter at EDE 2. Joel Turner (@JTMcGillEM) has presented some newer aspects at EDE 3. Here is a case from Dr Bernard Richard in Valleyfield that illustrates its utility. Incidentally , Bernard will be making his debut as an […]

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How do you like your liver?

March 4, 2014 0 Comments
How do you like your liver?

With POCUS we teach beginners to focus on the most basic knobology, physics, and imaging of the area that will answer their simple clinical question.  When mastering the FAST scan it’s all about focussing on the free fluid, don’t get distracted by anything else going on. With more experience however, we all start to appreciate […]

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